Even a bit of encryption based on hardware is better than having the password written plainly in the text file.. You could potentially even utilize the OSX password keyring.<div><br></div><div>As it stands I was requested to email my config file to you guys for debugging but whoops it had my passwords written out plainly in it...</div>
<div><br></div><div>=\</div><div><br></div><div>..<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Nov 23, 2010 at 5:41 PM, Juha Heinanen <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jh@tutpro.com">jh@tutpro.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">Dan Pascu writes:<br>
<br>
> The conclusion is that either you use a desktop system you own and<br>
> you're your own root user so you trust yourself implicitly, or you run<br>
> on a system owned by someone you trust. Otherwise there is no<br>
> protection against a root user that is willing and determined to read<br>
> your files or to know what you type on the keyboard.<br>
<br>
</div>the conclusion is wrong.  i can own my own system and it may get<br>
lost/stolen.  if blink would ask password each time blink is started, it<br>
would not be possible for the new "owner" of the system to recover the<br>
password at least if the system was not booted or blink was not running,<br>
when the system disappeared.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
-- juha<br>
</font><div><div></div><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Blink mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Blink@lists.ag-projects.com">Blink@lists.ag-projects.com</a><br>
<a href="http://lists.ag-projects.com/mailman/listinfo/blink" target="_blank">http://lists.ag-projects.com/mailman/listinfo/blink</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>